Wednesday, December 16, 2015

At the Starting Gate

 The track and signal guys have now installed the first crossing gate at the Museum entrance.  The wood is all new, but the rest of the parts were salvaged from various US&S gates of this type in our collection.  This is the first actual crossing gate on the property, and I'm really looking forward to seeing it operate!

















In other news, the Great Western plow group are welding together the frame to hold the headlight, which is mounted above the plow, directly in front of the cab.   And on the 24, the metal bumper has been attached to the east end of the car, which is now nearly complete.






 






 In the shop, I cleaned all the old paint off the last two buzzer cord hangers and the interior grab iron. 




Inside the 36, the number over the end door looks like this.  Because the underlying paint is alligatored, I decided to strip it off and repaint everything.  So the number was carefully traced.   There's no evidence of a number to go along with the DNA gold-leaf pattern, however.  Anyway, this will not be hard to reproduce.



And after a lot of sanding and prep, the final center section of the ceiling got its first primer.  













And here's the card table, with its new support leg.   The leg hasn't been painted yet, but I'll get to it.  Meanwhile, it makes a nice support for things that don't weigh very much, like sandpaper.



Lots of other things were going on today, as usual.  Bob Bruneau came out to visit, brought by his son Chris.  It was good to see him again.  And several of the usual Wednesday crew were working on their various projects. 



4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Nice table, but it needs some cigarette and cigar burns, and a few coffee cup rings ;-)

-Hudson

KIRK WARNER said...

The 36 will really shine when you put it into service next year. A vast improvement! Keep up the great work.

Anonymous said...

Were those CNS&M crossing gates or do they have a different parentage?
C Kronenwetter

Jeron G. said...

The North Shore used the exact same model of gates, however I think Bob Olson said these came from the Soo Line.